American Winter clearly defines what poverty looks like

There is an excellent documentary on HBO called “American Winter” by Joe Gantz which tracks eight Portland families who are struggling in this economy. Please check it out at www.hbo.com/documentaries/american-winter. This documentary puts a face on poverty and shows what these families are dealing with during the economic crisis. Since I volunteer with an agency that helps homeless families, I can assure you the problems portrayed in Portland are in evidence in North Carolina and elsewhere in the United States. For example, the median family income of the homeless families we help at the agency is $9 per hour. With a living wage in NC of $17.68 for a one adult/ one child family, you can see how people are having a hard time.

These people are living paycheck to paycheck and it takes only one thing to cause them to lose their house. It could be the loss of one job or the cutback on hours worked. Or, it could be a healthcare crisis.  We have people in America who are struggling and even dying because of lack of healthcare. According to The American Journal of Medicine in 2009: 62% of bankruptcies in the US are due to medical costs and 75% of the people whose illnesses caused bankruptcy were not insured or were under insured. This is the key reason we need the Affordable Care Act and for states to permit the expansion of Medicaid to cover them.

Yet, rather than make this about healthcare, I want to focus on why we have people in such crisis. I addressed many of these issues in two companion posts last fall based on Tavis Smiley and Cornel West’s book “The Rich and the Rest of Us.” The first post was written on October 20, 2012 and the second on October 29, 2012. We are not talking enough about our poverty problem in the US. The middle class problem is referenced often, but where did they go? Only a few moved up in ranks, where as the significant majority fell into poverty or near poverty.

As organizations have taken efforts to improve their profit margins dating back to the 1980s, we have seen a continuous downsizing and outsourcing of jobs. Since the early 1980s, the disparity between haves and have-nots became even more pronounced with the trickle down economics which has been proven to be unsuccessful, unless you were viewing it from the higher vantage point. As a result, there were multiple pressures on the middle class, which has led to its decline.  It only got worse when the economy went south. While there has been some repatriation of outsourced manufacturing jobs to the US, they have remained overseas for the most part.

So, if the worker did not stay up to speed with new technologies and, even if he did, there are fewer jobs for those without a college education. And, with the economic crisis, we have seen even having a college education is not enough these days. These unemployed did what they must, so where they could, started getting service jobs in retail, restaurant and hospitality industries. These jobs are near or at minimum wage and make you beholden to the number of hours you are permitted to work. Unfortunately, these jobs perpetuate poverty. You cannot afford healthcare and better food options and can barely afford rent. So, if something happens to your hours or job, you may lose your home.

The homeless families I have worked with work their fannies off. There are some I speak with in churches , who believe these families are homeless because they are less moral or virtuous and that is not it at all. Per Smiley and West’s book, poverty is the absence of money. Nothing more, nothing less. A few national stats to chew on:

– 40% of all homeless families in the US are mothers with children, the fastest growing segment;

– 75% of homeless children never graduate which perpetuates an ongoing cycle of homelessness; and

– 90% of homeless children suffer extreme stress; some worse than PTSD that former military face.

I mention these last two items, as even with all I say to the contrary, some people do not want to help the adults, who these obstinate people feel are totally responsible for their plight or are lazy. They see a chronic homeless panhandler on the street and paint all homeless people with that brush. That is a small, small subset of our homeless problem and, while we should help the chronic homeless people, there is a significant majority of homeless people who work hard, but cannot make it. Yet, I try to sell the concept of helping the kids. They did not sign up for being homeless and if we can help them, we can break the cycle of homelessness, the cost of caretaking is less, we gain a taxpaying citizen and we may be untapping a huge potential. The second place Intel Science Award winner in 2012 was a homeless girl, e.g.

We need to help these folks climb a ladder out of the hole they are in. It will be more beneficial to them and our society. And, we must provide educational paths forward, whether it be getting a GED, community or tech college schooling to learn new or improved skills. There have been some amazing things going in community colleges which can provide some paths forward. And, we need to pay people more. We have to improve the minimum wage to get at least to a living wage for an individual. It needs to be more, but if we can make that statement (making the minimum wage = a living wage) it speaks volumes and will help.

One of our dilemmas as a society is we must have a vibrant middle class to flourish. Unfortunately, the American Dream is a myth for many. We have one of the least upwardly mobile countries in the world. So, unless we make changes to our societal investments, we are destined to have only two economic classes of people. If you do not believe me, please check out my blogging friend Amaya’s website at www.thebrabblerabble.wordpress.com and check out the short video on economic disparity in our country. It is atrocious and unforgivable that this can happen in the US.

This is our collective crisis. Please watch “American Winter” or check out the above posts or Amaya’s. While “American Winter” highlights eight families, let me add a couple of more for you. One of our new Board members who works for a large bank was touring the homeless shelter and she came upon a colleague who was employed by the bank who was homeless. This stunned her that someone who worked at reasonable pay could end up homeless. Many live paycheck to paycheck in our country and it only takes a nudge for some to lose their home.

The other person I want to mention was living in a tent with her parents and younger siblings. Her dad was a construction worker and got some handy man jobs, but neither he nor his wife made enough to prevent losing their home. I highlight this teenager, as she would volunteer at a food bank to help others in need. Let me repeat this for emphasis. This homeless girl would volunteer to help people in poverty working at a food bank. We have helped this family get housed and they are climbing the ladder out of poverty. And, this young lady is now in college.

Let me shout this from the rooftops. Please help me become more vocal. We have a poverty problem in the US. We have a homeless problem in the US. We must help our neighbors and by helping them, we will help ourselves and country. Let’s help them climb these ladders. Let’s give them opportunities to succeed. If we don’t then we all will suffer.

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17 thoughts on “American Winter clearly defines what poverty looks like

  1. Such heartbreaking statistics, BTG. Just about everyone I know, including my own family, is one paycheck away from losing everything. It used to be frightening, but now it’s just a fact of life and we just keep plodding along, hoping for the best. The thing that galls me is how the far right demonizes the poor as parasites. Working Americans are the backbone of this country! I wish that I could go back in time and slap Ayn Rand in the face!

    (Thanks for the shout-out, I got a new follower)…You are the best:)

    • Thanks Amaya. I am glad you picked up a new follower. Your words should be heard by many. Please encourage folks to watch this “American Winter.” The conservative right has this image of what the poor look like and, in truth, it looks like everyone. This movie will rock their world a little and it should. When I tell people the folks this agency I work with helps are working, they cannot fathom that. Best wishes to you.

      • I have to watch it, but I don’t have cable TV right now. I will definitely watch it as soon it is available on Netflix or to rent.

        Pretty cool to get a new reader when I am not writing anything lately. But I am keeping up with my favorite bloggers so I will remember how it’s done!

      • Amaya, my niece and her husband don’t have cable either. They resort to Youtube and Netflix for their entertainment. With so few good shows on, I understand why. Take care, BTG

  2. My dear friend, I have awarded you for Epically Awesome Award of Epic Awesomeness! Congratulations! Please visit this link for the rules: transcendingbordersblog.wordpress.com/2013/03/25/epically-awesome-award-of-epic-awesomeness/

    • Many thanks. I appreciate greatly your thinking of me for this. I am not much into the award thing, which is the reason I pass on these. Your kindness is overwhelming and greatly appreciated. Please do not construe this as a lack of gratitude, it just is not my thing. I value more your reading and commenting and what you say on your blog. Bless you, BTG

  3. Pingback: What does a homeless person look like? | musingsofanoldfart

  4. This is such a touching post, and yes, I hear you to the point of tears. Unfortunately many others have ears but don’t hear. I think one of the reasons that I left that old life was to get back in touch with the person I once was. People are so caught up in existing that they aren’t looking around.. They’re all chasing the dangling carrot that promises happiness. Returning home is always bittersweet; I miss the people I care about, but I do not miss the materialism and lack of empathy for the poor.

    Reading your posts are always good for me, as I realize that we can all do more, so much more.

    Thanks for that.

  5. Pingback: I Have Mine, Go Get Yours | musingsofanoldfart

  6. Pingback: American Winter Revisted as we discuss minimum wage and unemployment | musingsofanoldfart

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