Help people find jobs by paying it forward

In my non-paying job, I spend time helping those who help people in need. In particular, I focus my efforts on homeless families, 84% of whom have jobs. Yet, the jobs are insufficient to pay their bills and when a crisis occurs, they end up losing their home. People who are in or near poverty are living paycheck to paycheck, so they are in a perilous situation as well. And, they number over 50,000,000 in the US. In fact, a statistic I have used frequently is 48% of Americans are living paycheck to paycheck. To see more on how fragile these families are, I would encourage you to watch the documentary “American Winter” which I wrote about on March 23, 2013.

One of the similarities I have witnessed about homeless families or people in poverty is their network of people they can get help from is either non-existent, exhausted or in a similar predicament. I mention this as when people who are doing pretty well are in need of something, they have a network of people to whom they can reach out. For example, I often am approached by friends, colleagues or family, about assisting someone they know network about a job or field of study. One of the reasons is I have been in business for a long time, so I have many contacts. Yet, the other reason is they know I will try to help. I tell people often I enjoy helping people network. It is my way of paying it forward.

When we think about how we can help people in poverty or in trouble, helping them network or connect to others is a way to pay it forward. I heard Bob Lupton, the author of “Toxic Charity” speak and he noted the church congregations are filled with people who have contacts or know how to merchandise yourself or a business and they could be of service to those who have no such experience or relationships. As an example, the mother of a homeless family was able to gain better employment in a doctor’s office through contact with a church volunteer who was lending the family a hand.

Toward this purpose, let me mention a few things to think about to help people in need find a job or gain a better job to support their family.

1. Help people network – this is the one of the most beneficial things you could do. Just as you would help the son or daughter of a friend, meet with the person in need. Find out what they are looking to do and what skills they have and help them connect with people and opportunities of which you know. When you look at your sphere of influence, it is larger than you might think at first glance.

2. Help people see a broader range of options – in my networking with folks, this comes up often. People may hone in on an industry or type of employer and may not have a good understanding of the various options that exist. After discussing the things in number #1 above, I might suggest have you ever thought about this kind of industry, profession or employer? I know they have more opportunities than good candidates, so you may want to consider these avenues.

3. Help people understand what skills they need to acquire or hone – this advice is dear as well. We are blessed with a wonderful community college system and other curriculums that can help people improve their skills. In fact, if you know people who volunteer their time to teach, then you can help connect them with others. If you want to work in an office, then you will likely need better Word, Excel and Powerpoint skills, e.g. If installing solar panels is a viable job, then you may want to check out Goodwill Industries as they partner with the community college to teach that.

4. Help people present well – an entire post could be devoted to this topic. But, what I would suggest in the networking sessions is to offer some coaching. Maybe you could help look over their resume, maybe you could help coach them to go online to learn more about the companies who they will be interviewing with, help them ask informed questions, etc. Maybe you could guide them to Linked In or other job search avenues.

As many in the job market have surmised, applying for a job online is a necessity, but will not get you many jobs. What will get you the job is people who can help you connect and will vouch for you. The homeless families we help have a support group and have been vetted more so than a person who has not been helped. Plus, they know what being down and out looks like, so once plugged into the right situation they will have a strong level of commitment to their employer. I say this last part because when I network, my name is important. I am vouching for someone, so I want to make sure the connection will be fruitful for both. If I don’t do this, then that some contact will be less inclined to review any resumes I forward. That is why meeting the person is important.

These are steps we each can take to help those in need. In so doing, we can help people find a job or find a better paying job in a growing career. And, if you watch “American Winter” you will see there are people just like you and me in need, some who never thought they would be in this situation. There, but by the grace of God, go I is very apropos. Let’s help pay it forward.

 

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24 thoughts on “Help people find jobs by paying it forward

  1. Thank you for your outreach efforts. You are to be commended. Every little thing we do, as individuals, can make a difference in someones life. I think we sometimes get caught up in the size of the problems we are faced with today, and too easily become overwhelmed. Thats when we need to step back, and realize each little thing we do can and does make a difference.

    Thanks for sharing your story, and lets hope it inspires at least one other person to extend a hand.

  2. I’m about to go job-hunting in August, when my youngest goes to school. I am feeling pretty intimidated by the process. Middle-aged with no real experience other than service-industry work makes it even scarier. I guess that’s a problem a lot of mothers face. We are smart, talented, able to juggle tasks like no one else, but being out of the game for so long puts us at a disadvantage. I’ll spend this summer trying to do my homework:)

  3. This is wonderful. Helping people see the bigger picture and present themselves well is crucial. I also want to add that many many skills transfer well from job to job. The ability to keep oneself organized, communicate effectively and a good work ethic flow well into any workplace. My degree is in social work with a psych minor. I’m an executive administrative assistant and contracts manager. Alas, I can communicate effectively and got a great work ethic – organizing things – now that takes some work for me! 😉 One more thing: Never discount an opportunity or an offer completely. As we all know life is funny and we never know where we are going to end up. Thanks for sharing this, I love it. D.

    • Thanks Donna. Great perspective and advice. You are 100% correct about the skills that cross all jobs. Another caveat to your last point, is never burn a bridge and always leave a place professionally. If you don’t it will haunt you. Thanks again, BTG

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