Where the crawdads sing – a terrific page turner

A few weeks ago, I asked my wife if I would enjoy Delia Owens novel “Where the crawdads sing.” I had given it to her for Christmas a few years ago and was looking for a good fiction read. I had bought it for her as it was #1 on the New York Times bestseller list and recommended by Reese’s Book Club (that is Reese Witherspoon). She said I would and she was correct.

For those who have read the book, I look forward to your comments below. If you have not, please avoid the comments, as my wife did a great job of not telling me things I did not know yet as I read. Plus, it won’t take you long to read, as the story, main character, and setting are very intriguing. I will not give anything away here.

Owens does a great job of toggling between two time periods, one that ages with Kya, the main character, and the other one set in 1969, when a body is discovered beneath an abandoned Fire Tower on a coastal region of North Carolina. We meet Kya in 1952 when she is only six and her mother leaves her family to get away from an abusive, drinking husband. As this occurs very early in the book, her older siblings also leave as they experienced verbal and physical abuse.

They lived in the marsh of this coastal area and we begin to learn about the differences between marshes, swamps and inlets, through this girl’s eyes. This “Marsh Girl,” as she will become known as to the small town of Barkley Cove, cannot read or count above 29, but she is very resourceful, knows the area, and briefly learns a few useful things from her father during his nicer periods. She also befriends a boy older than she, named Tate (who had been friends with her closest sibling Jodie) and a Black man named Jumper (who has a coastal filling station for boats) who are helpful to her journey.

The book is told largely in first person through Kya’s eyes, but we do get the occasional thoughts of other key characters, that help shape the story. They also offer a glimpse of the bias toward Kya as evidenced by the nickname, plus why those who help her, do so.

I highly recommend this book. The story and characters will intrigue you. You will also learn things that Kya learns or be amazed at what she had gleaned by age six, about the marsh, animals, birds, and fireflies. The title will also reveal its origins along the way. And, you will also learn through Kya’s eyes how people in different classes are treated or made to feel inferior.

Let me know your thoughts. Do your best not to give too much away for those who have not read the book, but they have been forewarned.

9 thoughts on “Where the crawdads sing – a terrific page turner

  1. Note to Readers: Having read the interview a 45 white woman had with a black man fixing her appliance, there is a key reminder in this book of racism. In the interview, the black man said in 2020 the worst thing I am ever called is “boy.” It is highly insulting and demeaning.

    In the book, Jumper, who is an older black man who helps Kya is ridiculed by little white boys, who call him boy. This was during the 1950s, but reveals how racism has to be carefully taught. Kya is treated horribly, as well, as she deemed marsh trash even as she ages.

  2. Pingback: Where the crawdads sing – a terrific page turner — musingsofanoldfart – The Hobart Chinaman

  3. I had downloaded this to my Kindle long ago, but hadn’t gotten around to reading it yet. I did not read any of the comments so as not to spoil the fun, but with your review, I have now pulled it up into my ‘currently reading’ and plan to start on it tonight! Thanks … I’ll let you know my take on it when I’m done.

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