The strangest thing

Listening to an interview with New York Times reporter David Enrich on NPR the other night, I heard a story that boggles my mind. When Donald Trump declared bankruptcy on six different enterprises, US based banks stopped lending him money. So, he went to German based Deutsche Bank for business loans.

Even there, Deutsche Bank’s investment bank soured on Trump and refused to lend him any more money. Then, its real estate mortgage bank soured on him and was owed US $50 million after refusing to lend him more. But, after bank leadership mandated no more lending to Trump, the story became even more bizarre.

Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, introduced him to a private wealth manager in New York for….Deutsche Bank. She arranged a $50 million dollar loan from Deutsche Bank’s private wealth group to pay back the outstanding loan with the real estate mortgage bank group within Deutsche Bank. Robbing Peter to pay Paul does not adequately define what happened. And, this is after Deutsche Bank leadership mandating no future loans with Trump. Enrich was unsure if this loan was still outstanding.

Having worked for a very conservative bank in my past, this is a quite surprising story. As a retired consultant, I am aware of one bank that had to be sold due to one very big loan defaulted. I am also aware of several banks who overextended themselves during the housing crisis that no longer exist. But, for Deutsche Bank to permit one part of the bank to pay off a loan from another part for a persona non grata individual, is quite strange and not in keeping with good stewardship.

It should be noted Deutsche Bank has been investigated and fined for money laundering for members of Russian oligarchy. It is also why there is interest in Trump’s financial dealings with this bank by the US Congress. Enrich noted Deutsche Bank is the “Rosetta Stone” to digging into Trump’s finances. This is why Trump has threatened to sue the bank to prevent such release.

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The sugar high is beginning to wane

The volatile and recent downward trend in the stock market is an indicator.The slowing of global growth, uncertainty over trade, increasing business costs due to tariffs and increasing interest rates are causing a dampening effect.

While the US economy had 3.5% annualized growth in the 3Q2018 following 4.2% in 2Q2018 (it was 2.2% in 1Q2018), imbedded therein are two numbers that should give pause. Business investment was much higher in 2Q2018 at 8.7%, partly due to getting stuff in the hopper before the tariffs started. Yet, business investment fell to 0.8% in 3Q2018. That is an ominous sign. This concern is also apparent in several third quarter earnings announcements by major corporations.

While we should finish 2018 with annual growth north of 3%, economists have predicted that 2019 will have 2.4% annual growth, falling to 2.0% growth in 2020. I should add they feel the impact of the tax cut for corporations is waning (which is sad because it is an imbedded profit margin increase). In other words, the companies view this tax reduction as a “sugar high” that won’t last.

When the tax bill was passed, the White House and Congress touted that it would take GDP growth to 4% and pay for itself. Tax cuts have never paid for themselves and the best they have done is abet the economy enough to save maybe 20% to 30% of the foregone tax revenue. But, the tax bill was estimated by the Congressional Budget Office to increase the already $21 trillion in debt by $1.5 trillion over ten years. And, the tax bill did nothing to address the projection the debt would increase by $10 trillion by 2027. Absent any change, we are looking at debt of $33 trillion by 2027.

It should be noted the annual deficit increased in the government fiscal year just ended to $779 billion from $665 billion, partly due to foregone $166 billion in tax revenue. The deficit is budgeted to be $985 billion in the 2018-19 fiscal year, on projected expenses of $4.407 trillion and revenue of $3.422 trillion. The deficit is expected to grow past $1 trillion in fiscal year 2019-20.

The US President has tended to be a short-term thinker. He is too focused on doing things that look good now. This is one reason he has had six bankruptcies. The problem is the sugar high is going to end. And, we spent $1.5 trillion to add more sugar to a pretty good economy. We are now beyond 9 years in economic growth (the second longest in US history) and 8 years in job growth, with a bull stock market dating back to March, 2009. Plus, we took one of our levers off the table with an unneeded tax cut. I was all for lower corporate tax rates, but we went well beyond deficit neutral.

This is not a new concern of mine, as I have been actively writing about our debt and deficit for several years, well before the current President took his oath. One of my concerns over Obama was his not doing anything with the Simpson-Bowles Deficit Reduction plan. Both he and Congress just put a very good working draft on the shelf. Our building debt is a ticking time bomb that will cause a huge day of reckoning. And, one things politicians don’t talk about it, is it will take tax increases and spending cuts to get there. The math will not otherwise work. That is the conclusion of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget and the Simpson-Bowles effort.