My neighbor with a rocket does not bother you?

What if you had a long time friend who lived across town? For decades, you had helped each other out. Then, this friend wants to be friends with your beligerent next door neighbor.

This neighbor had been shooting fireworks over your and your other neighbors’ houses. Your friend supported your and the neighborhood association’s desire to stop the fireworks, which happens. Everyone is hopeful the beligerent neighbor will behave going forward.

Then, the beligerent neighbor starts shooting fireworks near your fence. Again, you complain. But, this time your cross-town friend stands right next to you in your yard and says to the neighborhood association that the neighbor’s shooting fireworks does not bother him. What? But, it bothers me.

This happened in Japan just last week. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe stood there as US President Donald Trump said the North Korean testing of short range missiles does not bother him. It does seem to bother Trump’s head of National Security and Secretary of Defense, South Korea and the United Nations, but not the man who says his gut is smarter than everyone’s brain, which is insulting in and of itself.

The fact his former Secretary of State testified the week before to a Senate committee that Putin had “out-prepared” them is telling. And, a Politico article this week noted Trump continues to stand alone on North Korea. Yet, none of that would stand in the way of belittling legitimate fears, not the ones he contrives.

Many Americans do not realize Japan is one of our best allies. To stand on their soil and say their concerns about a beligerent neighbor are unimportant is an insult. To Abe’s credit, he reiterated his concerns referring to the missile test as a “quite regrettable act.” What he sadly realized then and there is what other people who have dealt with Trump eventually come to realize. You can cater to him, but he will not reciprocate.

Talking tough does not make you tough

One of the key lessons about bullies concerns false bravado. Talking tough does not make someone tough. Many would describe the US President as a bully, be it toward the press, Democrats, or people he perceives as enemies. But, what is interesting is he does not like confrontation, per several books about the man or the white house.

I mention this today as he spent the weekend picking on a dead hero by the name of Senator John McCain. Not only is Trump in the wrong and lied about various events and timing, but it reveals an incredible lack of judgment. He is likely regretting this lack of judgment, in that McCain’s daughter Meghan has used the term “pathetic” to define Trump’s action. It should be noted at least two Senators (Chris Coons and Lindsey Graham) have defended their deceased colleague. Picking on a dead hero is pathetic, especially when it is done by a man who can’t seem to get his facts straight.

Yet, we should not forget this man fired James Comey and Rex Tillerson while they were away. In Comey’s situation, he learned he was fired from breaking news. If that was not poor enough, Trump fired Andrew McCabe as he was cleaning out his desk to retire, to deny him his pension. What kind of man does that?

Finally, we should not lose sight of his acquiescece to Putin, Kim and MbS. He accepted their words over that of his own intelligence people. No less than our dead hero, Senator McCain was alarmed by what he saw in Helsinki with Trump’s kowtowing to Putin.

These examples speak volumes. Picking on a dead man is not tough. Firing someone without telling him is not tough. Not standing up to someone who had an American reporter killed and chopped up in little pieces is not tough. It is the word Meghan used – pathetic. It is also weak.

A bellwether event

In a sea of bad news last week for the US President, a bellwether event occurred as to why this man does not deserve to be the incumbent. A bellwether is something that is an “indicator or predictor of other events.” It is getting more press and even overshadows the event where and when it occurred.

At the unsuccessful conference with North Korea’s dictator Kim Jong Un, which the President’s own staff forewarned him of beforehand, the President took the word of Kim that he did not know of the maltreatment of American prisoner Otto Warmbier. This maltreatment led, first to Warmbier’s coma, and then his death once he returned home. The parents of Warmbier took issue with Trump’s siding with Kim, a man known for squelching the smallest of dissent or less than enthusiastic applause with murder. Killing his half-brother and uncle are just two examples of his evil nature. Even Republican Congressman Kevin McCarthy took issue with Trump’s acquiescence to Kim. He is not alone.

In the Washington Post,  Kathleen Parker’s editorial called “The president’s lying ears,” called the President on the carpet for this and other transgressions where he sided with despots over the advice of his own intelligence staff. Parker references “Trump’s strange attraction to tyrants, dictators, murderers and thieves.”  She goes on to say “Trump believed Russian President Vladimir Putin when he denied knowing about Russian interference with the 2016 presidential election. And, he believed Saudi Prince Mohammed bin Salman when he denied knowing anything about the torture, murder, and dismemberment of Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi.”

“At the same time Trump believed their lies, he disbelieved the conclusions of American intelligence agencies, which, in each case, pointed a finger at the top guys. How could it be otherwise?”  Before he passed away, Senator John McCain called the President on the carpet for his weak-kneed acquiescence to Putin in Helsinki. I so wish McCain was alive today, as he would again vilify Trump for his lack of support for Americans and America. He might say hugging the flag at CPAC won’t erase the malevolence of your actions to our country.

Yet, an article, by a regional libertarian thinker and humorist named Keith Larson, who does a podcast along with weekly articles, called “A proud deranged American,” adds the flavor in McCain’s absence. Apparently, the MAGA cap wearers have called him “deranged” for saying something similar to Parker. His response includes the following:

“I thought expecting a president of the United States to stand up for Americans against brutal dictators was central to conservatism…I thought seeing soldiers – even, and perhaps, especially, those who fell into enemy hands – as heroes, was part and parcel to patriotism….Kim Jong Un is a murderous despotic dictator, the president of the United States has become his fawning publicist, and anyone who can’t abide him and his presidency has a Derangement Syndrome.”

“Life, in Donald Trump’s America. Where I’m proud to be deranged.”

These are not fake news stories, as Trump likes to claim about any bad press. He said the words and has not defended Americans or America. He is everything Michael Cohen said and more, which is not a very flattering picture. But, even if he were not a “racist, con man and a cheat,” not standing up for our citizens and country is not very presidential, nor is it courageous. It is weak. Acting tough to cheering crowds does not make up for that weakness. Nor does hugging the flag.

 

 

More candid observations

In keeping with the theme of my previous post, the following are some diplomatic candid observations:

– Help me understand why the people in the White House seem surprised that North Korea is not going to give up its nuclear weapons? I applaud their and the the South Korean’s effort and energy, but we seemed to be a little naive that Kim would cave.

– Saying something under oath in front of a judge who will sentence you carries a lot more gravitas than tweeting or saying something to a favorable interviewer. Under oath, Michael Cohen said he committed illicit acts at the direction of the candidate. I realize Cohen is not a Boy Scout, but his words under oath should carry some weight.

– A man of character died Saturday on what would have been my parents’ 67th anniversary. Senator John McCain was an imperfect man with whom I did not always agree, but he was very honorable public servant. Character and honor are two words that are not top of mind when I look to define a certain man in a US leadership position. I think it speaks volumes that McCain asked such a man to be excluded from attendance at his funeral.

– It is nigh impossible to stop bigoted thoughts or the teaching of children about bigotry. But, we must shine spotlights on behaviors that strip away at other people’s rights or promote one group’s rights over that of another. We must share our disagreement with hate speech. The easiest thing to do is vote with your feet and avoid people and places that enable bigoted thoughts. Confrontation is difficult, but listening, questioning and commenting can be done civilly with some. Or, it can take the form of openly applauding the efforts and successes of people who seem to be targeted with hate speech more than others.

– Finally, one’s reputation is the dearest thing we own. Rob Roy said your honor is a gift you give to yourself. This is why it is puzzling so many Republican legislators are spending their dear reputation supporting a man who daily brings dishonor to the Presidency and would throw them under the bus if needed. Please note my intentional avoidance of the use of “leader” in my descriptions.

We Americans and others around the world are craving an honorable leader. And, as said in the movie “The American President,” being President is entirely about character.

From whose perspective?

A mentor of mine had a very common question he would ask of colleagues. A colleague (including this one) would be recounting that a client meeting went well. The mentor would simply ask “From whose perspective?”

Let this question sink in. I mention it today as Secretary of State Mike Pompeo met the past few days with his North Korean counterparts. At the same time he was recounting how much progress was made, the North Koreans were sharing their view. What we saw as progress, they referred to it as the US’ one sided “gangster-like” demands.

Further, there is footage of the North Korean officials asking Pompeo if he slept well on the second day of meetings. After he said he did, they said you should not have after the previous day’s meeting results. This statement is pretty telling that perspectives vary.

I am all for dialogue between countries that have issues. That is far better than the alternative. The Presidents of the US and South Korea deserve credit for rhe discussions with Kim Jong Un. But, it has been clear from the get go, the expectation levels are vastly different. Also, the preparation levels were and are very different. The North Koreans have studied this issue far more than the US leader’s team. For example, the key question we failed to understand is “why would North Korea cede a nuclear arsenal that they built to get people to respect and fear them?”

Perspective matters. This same mentor advised to “put yourself on the other side of the table.” In other words, do your best to understand what the other side wants and would accept. It applies to more than these discussions.

May I ask why?

On the final day of May, it seemed like a good time to ask some why questions. In no particular order:

May I ask why US leaders believe North Korea would give up all of their nuclear weapons after taking so much time, effort and money to build them? I am happy dialogue is occurring, but we need to manage our expectations.

May I ask why people would trust leaders who make sure their most viable opponents are not permitted to run against them? Call me crazy, but this is prima facie evidence that the leader’s story cannot stand up to scrutiny (think Putin, Maduro, el Sissi to name a few).

May I ask why legislators at the state and federal levels are trying to avoid normal process to pass legislation? Take it to the bank, when legislators avoid normal process, the issue is political and the people end up losing.

May I ask why someone who harps daily on his innocence, cries that everyone is against him, declares routinely that it is a witch hunt and often changes his story, should be believed? Using the scientific concept of Occam’s Razor, it is easier to believe that there is not this vast conspiracy against the man and far easier to believe this untruthful man is lying.

May I ask why many of us are forgetting what Jesus and other religious leaders told us and treating others so poorly? We need to walk the talk more, as to be frank, words are cheap. And, we need to hold our leaders accountable to be our better angels, even when they don’t hold themselves into account.

May I ask you offer comments, reactions and questions in response?

The week that was

Looking back at the week ending April 27, 2018, a few things jump out at me as examples of larger problems.

The US Congress heard a speech from a President that spoke of staying the course on America’s global role in security, free trade and environmental issues. He also warned of the unhealthy focus on narrow nationalism and promoted the ideals of the American experiment. Unfortunately, the speech was given by Emmanuel Macron of France and not the US President.

Yet, the US President did make news when he nominated another poorly vetted candidate this time for the VA director role. He was already a curious choice, but he and the White House were obviously not prepared for the discovery of potential peccadillos in his past. This is a recurring problem for the White House where too many candidates withdraw, should not have been nominated or are approved with some later being fired or resigning as past or new problems surface. It should be noted there are too many articles and biographies that do not define “due diligence” as a strength of the President.

Between two tragedies in Canada and the US, it shows that terrorism need not be imported. Four people died at a Waffle House in the Nashville area, while  ten people died on the streets of Toronto. The larger problem that is revealed time and again, it is very difficult to stop a motivated lone assailant. The only thing that has a chance is an invested community who cares about what happens there. Neither of these people were from an actively tracked hate group, which number over a thousand. Nor were they part of an extreme religious terror group.

On Thursday, a boyhood and even adult idol of mine, Bill Cosby, was found guilty of three counts of sexual impropriety. While the trial involved only one of his victims, the number totals over 60. This is very sad  that someone so present in the public eye for fifty years could harm so many people.

Finally, an unconfirmed report out of China notes that one reason North Korea may be eager to give up nuclear testing is they blew up their testing site. The report said an underground blast may have punctured a hole in a mountain and released some radioactive material. From what others have noted is Kim Jong Un likely does not want to give up the nuclear weapons they created and their conventional forces could do great damage by themselves to South Korea. But, this unconfirmed report is interesting nonetheless and offers a potential explanation for a willingness to talk. Setting this aside, Kim Jong Un wins by getting on the world stage in a meeting room. Yet, talking is far better than the alternatives for keeping a lid on things.

Many other interesting things have happened. Our friend Jill has an excellent summary on Ben Carson’s housing plan which will triple the rents for people in need. Maybe he should have remained a surgeon where he could help people.

That’s all folks. Have a great weekend.