Just a quick refresher on the ACA animosity in the Republican Party

Our friend Scottie asked me why the Republican Party detests the Affordable Care Act (ACA) so much and wants to kill it. I have written many posts about this, but here is quick refresher.

The Republican party has spent about ten years nay-saying the ACA. This is in addition to actual efforts to sabotage it by Senator Marco Rubio and President Donald Trump and the fourteen states who still have not expanded Medicaid. Rubio and Trump’s actions caused premiums to increase. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina (BCBS of NC) said it was geared to have a 0% increase in 2018, but after Trump de-funded reimbursing insurers for co-pays/ deductibles for people making less than 2 1/2 times the poverty rate, BCBS of NC said it would have a 6.6% increase. Not only did Rubio’s action cause premiums to go up, it drove some insurers out of the exchanges lessening competition which also hurt consumers. *

So, to me the Republicans are so far down the path of killing something that is working pretty good (it still needs improvements), they cannot stop. And, it is apparent that Trump has an Obama obsession that he must kill everything that Obama did regardless of its level of efficacy. As a retired benefits consultant and former actuary, what the GOP came up with in 2017 to replace the ACA was god-awful. It was throw-against-the-wall planning. The fact the Republicans did not follow due process was a key reason Senator John McCain voted it down. Mind you, I fault Obama for the terrible roll out of the exchanges in 2013, but he at least involved Republicans in the planning process in very public sessions (although they were told not to vote for it).

And, here is the rub. The reason the GOP does not have a plan is the ACA is largely based on a Republican idea set in motion by Mitt Romney for Massachusetts, when he was governor. It worked so well, that Senator Jim DeMint, the leader of the Tea Party, advocated its national use in writing to President George W. Bush. And, DeMint politicked with Romney on stage in 2008, Romney’s first run for president. I recognize the ACA is not exactly the same as Romneycare, but there are a number of similar constructs.

Everything I mention above, including the DeMint piece can be found by Googling. But, here is the major concern I have. Employers have been going to more part-time and contract work forces even before the pandemic. Why? – to avoid providing subsidized health care benefits. So, to survive in this gig and part-time employment world, the ACA is essential.

Plus, the ACA imposes requirements on employer based plans as well that may go away if SCOTUS rules unwisely with the court case. Those include pre-existing condition protection, guaranteed renewability, no deductibles on wellness visits, and limitations on insurer margins in pricing, e.g. So, a bad SCOTUS ruling could impact over 200 million Americans not just those in the exchanges and Medicaid.

* Note: The reason for the premium increases are complex, so I will mention them here. Rubio led a Republican move to defund 89% of the payments to insurers for adverse selection (pent up demand for new policy holders) for the first few years, a process used when Medicare Part D was rolled out. Insurers were forced to increase premiums and some left the market with the US owing them money that was promised. The Trump change is more complex. By stopping the reimbursement to insurers for this extra benefit for low paid policyholders, the insurers still honored their commitment to the policyholders. This drove up premiums. Trump said this would only impact insurer profits, but that was not true. The CBO said it increased the annual deficit by $10 billion because the premium subsidies went up as well. The people who ultimately got screwed were those who did not get a full subsidy.

ACA truths Republicans don’t want you to know

The Affordable Care Act is an imperfect and complex law, but it is actually working pretty good. It does need improvements, but a few of its imperfections have been heightened by our Republican friends in Congress and in state legislatures. Yet, they do not want you to know about these actions, some of which are quite devious and harmful to Americans. To be frank, this subterfuge frustrates me as people are harmed as the GOP tried to waylay the law.

What has not been reported very much in main stream news is Senator Marco Rubio’s successful efforts to stiff insurance companies. These companies were promised additional funding for taking on excessive bad risk, called adverse selection. This was done successfully when the Medicare Part D plans were rolled out. By stiffing the carriers, the insurance companies had to raise premiums even more than they otherwise would have. Some even left the exchanges as this action hurt their bottom line. Let me say this plainly. Senate Republicans screwed Americans with higher premiums to try and strangle the ACA. Rubio even bragged about this on the campaign, so please Google “Senator Marco Rubio and risk corridors” to read about what he did.

On the state level, 19 Republican led states chose not to expand Medicaid, a key component of the ACA. 31 states who did so are seeing fewer personal bankruptcies and better hospital accounts receivables. Republican John Kasich, who expanded Medicaid as Governor in Ohio and ran for President, said “Medicaid expansion is a no brainier.” I would have likely voted for Kasich had he won the GOP nomination.

Then there is the naysaying that has been facilitated by the 50 plus repeal votes. Far too many folks never gave the ACA the benefit of the doubt. It is imperfect and the exchanges were rolled out horribly, for which I blame former President Obama. Yet, this law has made a huge difference in the lives of many Americans.

Finally, what is ironic is the ACA is built off a Republican idea. This is a key reason Republicans don’t have a good replacement. In fact, former Senator Jim DeMint, the initial Tea Party leader, strongly advocated Romneycare, on which the ACA is loosely based, for the whole country. He even wrote a letter to President Bush advocating for it. Yet, when Romney ran for President in 2012, DeMint said both Romneycare and the ACA were unconstitutional. This hypocritical change of heart can be easily found by Googling “Senator DeMint and Romneycare.”

People need to know the truth. This is not false news as our President likes to claim. Please research these facts and read as much as you like. Then, ask your representatives to start governing with real information and look to help Americans. I strongly recommend we do not repeal the ACA and improve the law. To do otherwise, is poor form for those who hindered it at the expense of Americans.