My browser seems like a gossip column with the tribal BS – where is the news?

With all of the tribal BS going on, the folks who are supposed to report on the news seem to spend a lot of time correcting others. It has grown commonplace for very biased sources to make things up and watch the more legitimate news sources report on the lack of veracity of the biased source. To be honest,, news reports of the lack of veracity of some opinion hosts is not really news to me.

It should be noted this is all by design, as it gets people talking about nothing important overlooking the fact that things are not getting done. The other unfortunate objective is to discredit the whole news process. If sources with lots of followers lie often, and more reputable news sources get caught in a lie, it defames the news credibility. We just witnessed almost six years of a former candidate and president routinely claim that all negative news about him was “fake news.” Just because he said it was fake, did not necessarily mean it was not true.

But, this also impacts other politicians. As a group, politicians are not known for their truthfulness. And, some are well known for not being consistently truthful. This former candidate called an opponent “Lyin’ Ted” and was not far from the truth, yet he failed to look in the mirror when he made the accusation. Sadly, if a politican says something, check other sources. The body politic has earned this requirement.

So, if I see things in my browser that are he said/ she said stuff, I pass. Nowadays, if I see a picture of the former president who is not known for his veracity, I pass. The same goes for certain opinion hosts and politicians, as their words are usually less than truthful, so I pass.

I heard that…

Misinformation abounds, in general, but especially regarding the coronavirus. And, it is easily passed along, not just by politicians whose mission may be self-serving more so than altruistic, but by people who are trying to be helpful.

Listen and read what people in the public health or medical profession are saying. My previous post spoke of living our lives, but we still need to heed cautions.

People are reacting in various ways. A crisis brings out the best and worst instincts in people. It also reveals their insecuritues and other imperfections. But, at the heart of the matter, it shows how vulnerable we are.

Our friend Jill focused today on several folks doing good things in this time of crisis. A link to her post is provided below. Our friend Roger and I spoke of those who are hoarding, price-gouging and taking advantage of the crisis.

Quite simply, social distancing does not give one license to be a jerk. We can still be friendly and meet and greet from six feet away.

Yet, let’s not pass along misinformation. Facebook is attempting to pull down such posts. A key rule of thumb is if it sounds incredulous, it most likely is. It is like the countless bogus conspiracy theories, why questions can help diffuse them.

Finally, sources of information known to be less than truthful or factual are not suddenly going to be more accurate. If they appear that way, it is based on the knowledge they can no longer mask their lies. Good People Doing Good Things — Helpers In These Trying Times