From the ashes in Charleston good news appears

The horrible tragedy in Charleston that took the lives of nine people should not be forgotten. When people die at the hands of a terrorist bent on killing people who do not look like him, then their deaths are even more tragic. I have written and will write more about the underlying cause in the future, but now is the time to mourn the passing of not only people, but good people, as evidenced by their deeds and the actions of their relatives and friends.

From the ashes of this tragedy are two good news stories on which to build. Many are so moved by the relatives and friends who looked at the face of the killer (I will not mention his name), and through their pain, forgave the young man. Their forgiveness and conviction revealed what true faith looks like. These are the people this young man was taught to hate. These are the people who he had been led to believe were raping white women and taking over America. Well, if these are the people taking over America, we may be better served as they have more character and conviction than many people I know.

The other good news story is the galvanizing effect this tragedy has had on the Charleston community and others around the country. Seeing blacks and whites together mourn the loss of these good people is inspiring. I hope that this can continue to be the galvanizing force to improve understanding among people of different races. That it will help people walk in the shoes of others and not be segregated in thoughts and locations. And, I hope it will help people shine a light on bigotry and hate and tell these narrow-minded folks that their actions are not valued and are wrong.

Per the words of Rodgers and Hammerstein in the movie and play “South Pacific,” which was written during the height of the Jim Crow era, “Bigotry has to be carefully taught.”  We, the people, can choose to teach the opposite.