Competition and collaboration

I am reading a wonderful book on the life of Paul Simon. His story of dedication and diligence to his craft is an amazing read. He is a highly competitive, yet very collaborative professional. And, he notices these qualities in others.

Simon noted after meeting the driving forces of The Beatles, he saw how competitive John Lennon and Paul McCartney were. They made each other better trying to outdo the other. But, they also were highly collaborative with each other and other musicians within the band and recording studio.

Don Henley and Glenn Frey of The Eagles were similar. Like Simon and the lead Beatles, Henley and Frey are highly prolific songwriters. Yet, they worked relentlessly on their harmonies. They were as close to flawless as possible. Regardless of who sang the lead, the others contributed to making the music sound even better.

The Beatles were known for their harmonies as well, with numerous takes and much practice. Like The Eagles, regardless of the lead, they all worked together to get the right sound, either vocally or instrumentally. There is a great documentary on the making of Sgt. Pepper that highlights the competition and collaboration which created the most acclaimed album of its time.

Back to Paul Simon, he and Art Garfunkel would practice their harmonies facing each other to watch the other’s mouth as they sang. They even preferred to record singing in one mike because rhey felt it sounded better. And, like The Beatles, Simon constanty pursued makig the music better collaborating with other musicians who brought different styles of music.

Plus, Simon is competitive due to being told he was not tall enough, he wasn’t good enough, he didn’t have the right birthplace to be a folk singer, he wasn’t rock-n-roll enough, he couldn’t sing as well as Garfunkel, etc. Simon just learned his craft behind the scenes even going to England where he was more accepted for his unique style and songwriting.

Competition is a good thing. Yet, checking egos and working together make the product even better. Collaboration is vital, otherwise the competition can become unproductive through sabotage or rooting for failure. The dysfunction in Congress and White House are obvious examples where the absence of collaboration is stifling progress.

So, it is more than fine to compete, but do collaborate. That added seasoning could make all the difference.

 

Lyin’ Eyes

The Eagles sang about infidelity in their popular song “You can’t hide your lyin’ eyes. And, your smile is a thin disguise.” I mention these lyrics because of the lack of fidelity to the truth exhibited by various politicians.

The comedian Jimmy Kimmel is being vilified by conservative news sources regarding his calling on the carpet Senator Tom Cassidy about his misrepresentation of what is included in the Graham-Cassidy Obamacare replacement bill. Based on fact checkers, Kimmel knows what is in Cassidy’s bill more than Cassidy does.

This would not be the first time politicians have lied about Obamacare. Obama oversold it saying you could keep your plan, which was at odds with most insurance changes. Yet, the lion share of the lying has been by Republicans. This law is imperfect and needs improvements, but it is not in a death spiral or is broken as portrayed by the GOP. The GOP has also not been forthcoming about their multiple attempts to hamstring the law at the expense of Americans increasing their premiums even more.

But, no US politician can lay a hand on the  greatest liar on record. This man has been measured by Politifacts as telling the complete truth only 5% of the time. When partial truthtelling or more is included, the rate increases to 31%. Saying it differently, this man lies 69% of the time, which is consistent with his rate of lying on the campaign trail. This man, of course, is the White House incumbent.

What I have noticed over the years, when politicians lie, the people who are most harmed are US citizens. The reasons and broadcast success rates for the Vietnam War were packed with lies. The sad truth is the percentages of those who died or were injured were much higher for African-Americans and poorer Americans. They bore the brunt of the lies.

Scrolling forward, when Trump and other politicians lie, people tend to die at higher rates. If the ACA is replaced as planned in GOP bills, more folks will be uninsured and  be at risk. By pretending climate change is not a threat or that governing environmental issues are less important than business leaders’ companies, people will die.

I recognize politicians have always lied, but never before at this rate or with such impunity. Our leaders dishonor the flag when they lie so much. And, they hurt our standing in the world. Right now, other world leaders do not trust Trump. They have good reason.

 

 

 

 

The more I practice the less I suck

The above phrase was uttered by Joe Walsh, the legendary guitarist with The Eagles and as a solo artist. Walsh was a guest on Daryl Hall’s show “Live at Daryl’s House,” where Hall has a studio in his mountain house and the crew and guest jam together, then cook and eat a meal. It is worth the watch (see a link below).

After jamming on Funk 49, Rocky Mountain Way, and Life’s Been Good along with a few of Hall’s songs, the group sat down for a meal which they prepared with a guest chef. As they spoke of how they got started in the music business, Walsh regaled them with his story.

In essence, Walsh spoke of an early band where “we all sucked.” This brought lots of nods and smiles. Then, he said The Beatles came out and they learned to cover The Beatles’ songs. He said if you knew the songs, you could get gigs and they began to play more. But, they also had to practice more beforehand. Eventually, they got closer to Malcolm Gladwell’s 10,000 hours of practice, which ironically referenced The Beatles in his book “Outliers.” Gladwell noted The Beatles were sent to Hamburg to learn to play better in front of an audience with seven shows a night, six days a week.

And, he then uttered the above line. The more I practiced, the less I sucked. This succinct lesson applies to far more than playing music or singing. It could be related to golf, tennis, free throws, research, business analysis, teaching, presentations, general medicine, surgery, investing, etc. It could be as basic as driving a car or learning to cook or bake.

If we put in the time, we will suck less. Doing something once, does not make you proficient. It means you did it once. It takes practice to get better at something. Thanks Joe for your music and advice. You no longer suck.

http://www.livefromdarylshouse.com/