Medical Marijuana Continues Growth

A topic which continues to build in momentum is medical marijuana. In the US, twenty-nine states and the District of Columbia have legalized marijuana for at least medical purposes. And, Canada just passed a law effective in October allowing the legal personal use of marijuana by those over age 18,

Time Magazine has issued a Special Edition called “Marijuana – The Medical Movement.” It is an excellent summary of its history and current uses. It notes the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine published their findings in January, 2017 citing marijuana is a therapy for a number of ailments, but especially pain.

Yet, this is not new, as history reveals marijuana showing up as a treatment in China 4,000 years ago, India and Greece around 50 AD and in England and Ireland in the 1600s. It was prescribed in the US until the movie “Reefer Madness” focused on its psychotic influence in the 1930s.

Today, the tide has turned in its favor with over 90% of Americans supporting it for medical purposes. From epileptic seizures to CTE to Crohn’s to Chemotherapy to MS, people have indicated how it has helped them with their issues. But, its main benefit has been with pain as a replacement for or in lieu of opioids.

I have a relative who has been able to get off all pain medication by using a cannabis oil from which he creates a salve. Rubbing it directly into the skin has helped him not only with the pain, but regaining his ability to speak and think more lucidly sans opioids. Suffice it to say, after several car accidents, he was in a bad way. The impact is quite noticeable.

This topic is worthy of serious discussion. The opioid epidemic is truly a national crisis. Medical marijuana is not a panacea, but it will help with this and other issues. It has already passed a tipping point. We just need to check previous conceptions and look at it with both new and much older lenses.