Songwriters and performers – a reprise

Periodically, I have written posts about the songwriters and performers who combined words and music so magically. The posts that have received the most notoriety on my blog are not necessarily the biggest names, although they are indeed popular.

The post on Bob Seger has been my most visited musical post. When I think of the line from the movie “Eddie and the Cruisers,” about the key to a great song is words and music, I think of a short list of names including Seger’s. “Rock and Roll never forgets” sang Seger. He is right .

The second most read, but with a bullet, is a tribute to Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young. Four terrific songwriters and musicians in one group. This post may pass Seger’s soon, but in fairness to Seger it is four against one. Plus, the music of CSNY has a more cultural message. Their self-titled first album with the four of them with “So Far” tacked on the end of the title is one of the finest end to end albums ever, in my view.

The next in kind is the post about Gordon Lightfoot. He is indeed a troubadour, but his songwriting has been covered by many including Peter, Paul and Mary and Elvis Presley. He is still touring, so try to catch his laid back sing-a-long. He speaks about his songs and life, which are also poignant reflections.

The fourth most frequented post is by an artist who left us much too soon, Jim Croce. His music spoke clearly about loneliness, heartache, love, melancholy and relationships. Had he not died so young, he would be as popular as any song writer.

Below is a link to these posts. They may also link you to other musical posts, so please feel free to reminisce and share your favorites. A few others to consider that I have written about include, but are not limited to: Janis Ian, Joan Baez, Heart, Don McLean, Harry Chapin, and Rush.

21 thoughts on “Songwriters and performers – a reprise

  1. Note to Readers: One of the true tests of great songwriters is to go deep in their body of work and find gems. These songs may not have been their most popular songs, but they are marvelous. Jim Croce has good examples in “Alabama Rain” and “Lover’s Cross,” my personal favorite. Gordon Lightfoot has good example in “Rainy Day People” which reminds me of wife and her ability to listen well to others. All four sets of performers have great deep cuts, so give the whole CD or album a listen or you might miss something.

  2. Very good post. I enjoy all these artists. I’d like to add “The Circle Is Small” to the list of Gordon Lightfoot standouts. The loss of Jim Croce was so tragic; no telling how many more great songs we’d have gotten from him if he was still around. These are all terrific songwriters, from whom today’s generation of songwriters could learn a thing or two.
    Larry

    • Good song add. You are so right they could teach a lot to new songwriters. We got to see Seger and Lightfoot. As for Croce, on a long drive to Montreal, we listened to an entire box set of Croce’s music. It was marvelous. Keith

  3. Note to Readers: Each member of CSNY is adept as a songwriter, both before, during and after their group convened. Neil Young is one of my favorite songwriters by himself, but Graham Nash, Stephen Stills and David Crosby have made tremendous contributions, as well. Young has penned “Helpless,” “After the Gold Rush,” “Cinnamon Girl,” “Ohio,” and “Old Man” just to name a few.

  4. Music is a wonderful thing! We almost went to a Gordon Lightfoot concert last month, but we both forgot about until 2 days after. We are getting old. LOL! He was performing an hour away from us.

      • Thanks but its fine. It was one of those things when we heard about it we said hey that would be fun to go too , but then didn’t think about it til too late. We did both wonder if he still sounded good. Some amazingly can keep their good voices as they age and then there are others that need to givr it up. 🙂

      • Joy, he still sounded good when we saw him about ten years ago. The volume of his voice was not quite as loud, but he made up for it with his story telling between songs. Keith

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